Homework: Helping Students Manage their Time

This is the second of two parts. Part one can be found here: Is Homework Helpful?: The 5 Questions Every Teacher Should Ask.

Teachers assign work each and every day, either in class or for homework. That is the easy part. Put it on the board, tell students to copy it down, and move on to the next item on the day’s agenda. But why don’t teachers help students figure out how much time to allot to assignments? How do students know if an assignment should take 10 minutes or 40?

It is a blind spot in my own teaching. I never realized until lately that I wasn’t supporting students with time management skills. I wasn’t developing their ability to assess an assignment and correctly evaluate how much time it should take.

Why is this important? With good time management, students know how much time they have, how long it will take to get assignments done, and what they can accomplish in the time they have. This gives them more breathing room, which reduces the feeling of being rushed, which in turn leads to less frustration and stress.

Here are two ways to support students in understanding time management.

Do the assignment yourself — See how long it takes you to complete the work. Then remember, you are the expert with this material. Ask yourself, how long would it take for a proficient student to complete it? What about students with disabilities, what might hinder their progress? Then provide students with a range of times. If you believe an assignment should take 15-25 minutes, let them know. The benefit of this is that it allows students to plan better. They can situate homework in the context of their entire day. A student may get home from school at 3:30 and has soccer practice at 5pm. He now knows that he can complete your homework in any 25-minute window between the end of the school day and the start of practice. The downside to this is that some students may lose confidence and doubt themselves if an assignment takes much longer than you suggested.

Rate the assignment — Classify assignments into three categories with time frames for each so that students know what type it is and how long it should take to complete. Here are three ways that I categorize assignments:

Quick checks — These assignments are measuring sticks of understanding and they are short and sweet. I expect students to spend 20-50 seconds on each question on these types of assignments. A 20-question quick check should take 6-10 minutes.

Thorough Responses — When you want answer with more substance and more development, I look for thorough responses. These types of assignments are different than quick checks because I expect students to spend 2-4 minutes per question. Thorough responses typically have fewer questions consequently.Thorough response assignments take my students 20-35 minutes.

Sustained Thought — When students must access new material, when there is challenging reading, or when they must chew on ideas before they formulate responses,  students can expect to spend 30-40 minutes to complete an assignment.

http://www.edutopia.org/discussion/homework-helping-students-manage-their-time

Is Homework Helpful?: The 5 Questions Every Teacher Should Ask

The Common Core has asked teachers to increase rigor by diving deeper into the material. Consequently, everything has been ramped up, classwork and homework no exception.

My nephew, a fourth grader, has 40-50 minutes of homework a night plus independent reading and projects. When you include a snack break, the distractions from his younger sister, and his fourth-grade attention span that is bound to wander, that time often gets doubled. He is hard working and conscientious, but many nights result in distraction, frustration and anxiety.

The National PTA recommends 10-20 minutes per night in the first grade, and an additional 10 minutes per grade level thereafter (e.g., 20 minutes for second grade, 120 minutes for 12th). If you follow these guidelines, students will spend 137,160 minutes doing homework from first grade to 12th grade. That equals 2,286 hours or 95 straight days of homework.

Yet, high school students in Finland rarely get more than a half-hour of homework a night. It, as a country, allows children to engage in more creative play at home. This is significant because its students scored remarkably well on international test scores. It has many parents and education advocates in America questioning our practices.

So, are we misguided with all this work? To answer that, one must step back and question the value of assignments. How often should they be assigned? Where is the line between too much and too little? Here are five considerations to help you determine what to assign and why.

1. How long will it take to complete?

There are no surefire guidelines or golden rules that say how long students should work, especially since they progress at different speeds. Assignments need to lead to better learning outcomes. To achieve this, one must balance efficiency and effectiveness. The more efficient the assignment, the more material and learning that can be covered over the course of a year.

Yet, here’s the rub. It must not be so quick that the material is not mastered, nor so long to provoke boredom. In between there is a sweet spot that everyone should seek.

2. Have all learners been considered? 

Often, teachers make assumptions about the time it takes to complete an assignment based on the middle-of-the-pack kid. Yet, struggling learners can take double or triple the time as other students to complete an assignment. Don’t just think about the average learner, consider the needs of al students.

3. Will an assignment encourage future success?

A longer assignment can be justified if it is meaningful. Work that builds confidence and opens the door to future success is certainly worth it. Worthy assignments encourage participation in upcoming activities rather than discourage it. Teachers must explain the benefit of classwork and homework so that students will be sold on its benefit. Without the sales pitch, or the awareness of its purpose, students will view assignments as busy work.

4. Will an assignment place the material in a context the classroom can not? 

Homework is effective when classroom learning is transferred beyond the school walls. When teaching area, have students measure the area of a refrigerator shelf to determine what size sheet cake will fit for an upcoming party.  When teaching the types of clouds, have students observe them in their own back yard. Make the learning applicable to everyday life, and it will be worth the time it takes to complete.

5. Does an assignment offer support when a teacher is not there? 

Students can reduce the time it takes to complete assignments if they know where to turn for help. In the case of homework teachers are not there at all. Assignments should not only check for understanding, they should also offer support when students struggle.  Teachers should provide links to online tutorials, like Khan Academy, that offer instruction when stuck.

This post is the first of two parts. The second part can be found here: Homework: Helping Students Manage their Time.

http://www.edutopia.org/discussion/homework-helpful-5-questions-every-teacher-should-ask

44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

by TeachThought Staff

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/44-diverse-tools-to-publish-student-work/

Educators are often admonished to design work that “leaves the classroom.”

This is partly a push for authenticity. Work that is “real world” will naturally be more engaging to students because it has more chance to have credibility in their eyes, and usefulness in their daily lives. This kind of work has value beyond the current grading period and culminating report card.

But work that is made public has other benefits as well. If someone besides the teacher is actually going to read it, students may be more willing to engage their hearts and minds in their work. This kind of work is also often iterative–done in stages, with drafts, revisions, collaboration, and rethinking. It’s design work, and as design work, it gives students a chance to show what they know. This is one of the gifts of digital and social media, and an idea we’ve approached before with 7 Creative Apps That Allow Students To Show What They Know.

Tony Vincent from learninginhand.com revisited that idea with the following graphic that clarifies another talent of education technology–shared thinking.

Publishing Student Work vs Assessment

In lieu of its perceived art and science, assessment is a murky practice.

Anything a student “does” can be used as a kind of assessment. What the say, write, draw, diagram, create, or otherwise manifest that is then shared with someone else is evidence of thinking. This can be taken as a snapshot–create a video that clarifies the cause-effect relationship of pollution and the water cycle–or something more project-based and done over time, such as a storyboarding, creating, drawing, and publishing a comic book character over a 8 part series that explores the issue of bullying over social media. Either way, because the work is mobile and digital and easily shared, its ripe for both assessment and sharing with authentic audiences in the real world.

When students publish their thinking with their right audience or collaborators at the right time, the tone and purpose of the work are able to shift dramatically. The following tools either allow you to publish student work online (e.g., YouTube, Prezi, wevideo), or create something digital that can then be published in relevant contexts (e.g., Story Me, Book Creator, Puppet Pals HD).

The tools to publish student work are separated into 11 varied categories that run the spectrum of digital publishing, a list that’s nearly as useful as the graphic itself. You can find the list, graphic, and tools below.

11 Categories Of Digital Tools To Publish Student Work

  1. Audio Recordings
  2. Collages
  3. Comic Books
  4. Posters
  5. Slide Presentations
  6. Digital Books
  7. Narrated Slideshows
  8. Movies
  9. Animations
  10. Screencasts
  11. Study Aids

44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work 

WEBTOOLS: NO REGISTRATION NEEDED FOR STUDENTS

Image courtesy of OZinOH

Welcome to my list of webtools that don’t require student registration. This started off as a simple curation for myself and has ballooned into something that I never thought would get this big. And it is still growing. I started added comments to each link, but that is taking a long time to complete. Please bear with me as I update it.

While I do try to verify each link on a regular basis, please be aware that websites do change and some of these sites may no longer be active or may have switched to a paid version. Also, some of these sites rely on advertisements and so be careful when using with younger students. To make it on this list, a site must be:

  1. Free. There may be paid versions, but there is an option to use without paying.
  2. Without the need for students to give their email address. Teachers may have to register, but there is an option for students to either sign-in or use without giving their own email address or log-in with their Facebook/Google/Twitter/etc. account.
  3. For the most part, interactive or creative. The ideal tool allows the student to express themselves through creation, but some of these tools are for teachers only.
  4. Completely online. There should be no need to install something to make it work. Some of these sites require things like Flash or Java which are on most desktop and laptop computers, but are normally not accessible on a tablet or phone.

Over the next while, I will be adding labels to each of these to designate whether you can use this site without any registration at all or will need the use of a class code given by the teacher. Also, where I find the tool especially useful, I have also added some sites that need an email address, but can be used with a completely fake email address since the site doesn’t require you to verify your email address.

If you find a bad link, bad site, or any other error, please let me know through the comment section. Also, if you know of sites to add to this list, let me know and I will post it giving credit to you. Thank you.

https://nathanghall.wordpress.com/about-2/webtools-no-registration-needed-for-students/#screen